Conferences and workshops

February 2017

Arctic Change and Its Influence on Mid-Latitude Climate and Weather

Date: 1st - 3rd February 2017
Location:  Washington, DC, USA

The Arctic has warmed more than twice as fast as the global average, experienced rapid loss of sea ice, and collapse of warm season snow cover.  These profound changes to the Arctic system have coincided with a period of ostensibly more frequent events of extreme weather across the mid-latitudes, including extreme heat and rainfall events and recent severe winters. 

The workshop is co-sponsored by US CLIVAR, the NSF Arctic Natural Sciences Program, and the WWRP Polar Prediction Project.


April 2017

Arctic Science Summit Week 2017

Date: 31st March - 7th April 2017
Location: Prague, Czech Republic

Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW) is an annual gathering of international organizations involved in Arctic research. It is designed to strengthen collaborations across academia, government agencies, local communities, industry, non-governmental organizations and other Arctic stakeholders.

For more information visit the ASSW2017 website.


EU-PolarNet 3rd General Assembly

Date: 3rd April 2017
Location: ASSW/Prague, Czech Republic

EU-PolarNet's third general assembly coincides with the ASSW2017, which is held in Prague.

Arctic Science: Bringing Knowledge to Action

Date: 24th - 27th April 2017
Location: Reston, Virginia, USA

Building on the 2011 Arctic Messenger of Change Conference held in Copenhagen, Denmark, the 2017 International Conference on Arctic Science: Bringing Knowledge to Action will provide updated scientific, decision-making and policy-relevant information across a broad array of different Arctic issues and related scientifc disciplines.
Emphasis will be on what state-of- the-art research is now telling us about present and future change within the Arctic- and its implications for policy- and decision-making. Organized to include plenary and breakout sessions covering both disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, results from the various sessions will be used in shaping future science priorities and strategies across the Arctic Council’s six Working Groups.

Topics Addressed

  • The Arctic Cryosphere - Past, Present and Future Climate Change and related Impacts
  • Pollution in the Arctic - Sources, Pathways and Effects
  • Human Health Aspects of Pollution and Climate Change
  • Current and Future Processes and Consequences
  • Global and Arctic Systems Feedback Mechanisms - Science and Consequences
  • Resilience Within Arctic Ecosystems
  • Science and Policy-Making - Successful Deployment of Multilateral Adaptation, Mitigation and Climate Intervention Science Policy
  • Socio-Economic Drivers and Impacts of Arctic Change

May 2017

Opportunities and Challenges in the Polar Regions

Date: 22nd - 25th May 2017
Location:  Cambridge, UK

Opportunities and Challenges in the Polar Regions is a short 3 day international course designed to give an intensive and expert insight into the polar regions and the challenges they face.

The polar regions are altering very rapidly as a result of climate change and human development. People working in a wide range of business sectors need to understand what is happening, and decide how they and their organisations can best adapt and operate in these cold and remote environments. This course will give the information and answers professionals need, and provide new perspectives and insights into what is happening today in the Arctic and Antartica.

This unique course has been developed and organised by the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI), British Antarctic Survey (BAS), and the University of Cambridge's Institute of Continuing Education (ICE).

The cost to attend the course is £2,995 per person.

For more information about the course and its objectives please visit course's website.

June 2017

Ninth International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences: People and Place

Date: 8th - 12th June 2017
Location: Umeå, Sweden

ICASS is held every three years, bringing together people from all over the world to share ideas about social science research in the Arctic. ICASS VIII, held in Prince George, Canada in May 2014, attracted 470 participants from 27 different countries.

ICASS IX's theme is People and Place. Research on social sciences and humanities have a great responsibility to address the challenges for sustainable development in the Arctic, with a specific focus on the many different parts of the Arctic and the people that live there. The multiple Arctics have lately been addressed by many policy makers and researchers. The purpose is often to counteract the stereotypic understanding of the Arctic too often represented by icebergs and polar bears. A focus on people and place highlights the many variances across the region in terms of climate, political systems, demography, infrastructure, history, languages, health, legal systems, land and water resources etc.

Our sessions:

  • 17.1 Stakeholder engagement: moving from quantity to more quality

    Arctic research projects have increasingly adopted stakeholder dialogue and engagement processes. The EU for instance is drafting a new polar research agenda together with relevant stakeholders and all new research projects funded by the EU need to engage with stakeholders (EU-PolarNet). But little is known about how successful all these research projects are in this engagement process and what methods are being used. In this session we not only present potential frameworks of stakeholder engagement but we also look for ways of scientific assessment of such engagement activities:
    • How can we achieve that not only the quantity of stakeholder engagement is increasing, but above all the quality.
    • What research has been done and or should be done ABOUT the stakeholder engagement?
    • What can we learn from related engagement processes like social licence to operate, social impact assessments, community based participatory research and inclusion of Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Indigenous Methodologies? And which research gaps can we define?
    • How can consultation be done as a (meaningful) process throughout a project life span rather than e.g., a single pre-study consulting event (which might be understood by the stakeholder as token rather than sustainable inclusion of their views and needs)?
  • 17.11 Incorporation of Social Science and Humanities in large EU projects

    In the last decades social sciences have substantially increased their voice and visibility in Polar research (particularly in the Arctic) that is, also historically, dominated by natural sciences. However, insights form social sciences over the last two decades or so have led to a better understanding of rapid societal changes also in the context of physical processes such as climate change etc. Interdisciplinary (collaboration of social sciences, humanities and natural sciences) and transdisciplinary research (collaboration with stakeholders) becomes therefore also more and more a requirement in programs of national and international research funding agencies.
    This is also the case for the EU commission funded EU-PolarNet initiative.The EU-PolarNet consortium is set to develop an integrated EU Polar research programme by identifying short and long-term scientific needs. It also seeks to optimise and co-ordinate the use of Polar infrastructure for multi-platform science missions whilst fostering trans-disciplinary collaboration on Polar research. An important focal point for this, and in future EU projects, is the inclusion of Social Science and Humanities in Polar research projects -also in those in the natural sciences. During this session we want to discuss the way we can best achieve this and the topics to be included. We also wantto see which lessons we can learn from other projects, or research group.

 

More information about ICASS IX.

July 2017

Depths and Surfaces: Understanding the Antarctic Region through the Humanities and Social Sciences

Date: 5th - 7th July 2017
Location: Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

 

Antarctica rarely makes it onto the map of the humanities and social sciences. While artists have produced responses to the continent for centuries, non-scientific researchers have been reluctant to venture intellectually into the far southern latitudes. The continent's lack of an indigenous or permanent human population, together with a popular Antarctic exceptionalism which frames the continent as immune to the political, social and economic forces that affect the rest of the globe, has made it seem off-limits to analysis outside of a scientific framework.

Increasingly, however, public attention is being drawn to Antarctica, as the surface of its ice plays host to tourists, proliferating stations, heroic re-enactments, and national manoeuvring; its icy depths reveal the environmental history of our planet; and its ocean currents ominously undermine the glaciers around its edges. While scientific efforts are crucial, understanding the Antarctic region - past, present and future - requires contributions across the disciplinary spectrum. This conference aims to bring together humanities, creative arts and social sciences researchers interested in the Antarctic, fostering a community of scholars who can act in concert with natural scientists to address the issues that face the Antarctic region.

CALL FOR PAPERS

We invite papers from a broad range of disciplines - including history, literary and cultural studies, creative arts, sociology, politics, geography and law - that engage with the Antarctic, sub-Antarctic and Southern Ocean. Contributions from scientists interested in engaging with the HASS community are encouraged. Both proposals for individual papers (20 minutes with 10 minutes question time) and interdisciplinary panels are welcome.

ABSTRACTS of up to 250 words, including a short bio note, in WORD doc format, should be emailed to antarcticassag@gmail.com by 3 March 2017, with notification of acceptance by 31 March 2017. There will be an opportunity for selected papers to be expanded into one or more publications stemming from the conference.

More information on the conference website.